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  • Sprocket Change

    Does anyone have a recommended sprocket setup for the TL? I currently have a 42 tooth rear and not sure what front, however 17 tooth is stock. I keep eating up the aluminium rear sprockets, this will be my 3rd one I have had to buy. I found these titanium sprockets from sidewinder sprockets and wonder if anyone has tried them or knows anything about them. They claim that if you wear it out, they will replace it for free. I might go with a 15 or 16front and a 42 rear, which switches the ratio from 2.37 to 2.80. I realize I will have more low end torque and less top end speet which is fine since i'm not into speeding so much anymore.

  • #2
    Re: Sprocket Change

    I run the stock sprocket sizes so I can't recommend any changes there. But I will say that you should stop waisting your money on aluminum or titanium sprockets. Steel sprockets are the way to go as far as longevity is concerned. They are cheap and last longer than anything else. Yes those lightweight ones will provide a slight advantage in parsitic power loss. However I think the durability factor and price makes steel the winner for anything but a true race bike.

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    • #3
      Re: Sprocket Change

      Use steel.

      Run a 17T front and whatever one the rear.

      15T is too small.
      "I spent most of my money on Scotch, women and cigarettes. The rest I just wasted"

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      • #4
        Re: Sprocket Change

        :iws: whatever you do, stay 17t in the front. I have the aluminum carrier/steel tooth rear sprocket from sidewinder. Not sure of the mileage, but there is quite a bit with very little wear....(and it looks pretty)

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        • #5
          Re: Sprocket Change

          anything smaller than 17 in the front will EAT UP THE RUBBER PIECE that protects the swing arm. the rear doesnt seem to matter so much.

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          • #6
            Re: Sprocket Change

            The sidewinder stuff is pretty good stuff, or at least I bought into their propaganda based on recommendations from dirtbike racers.

            wingnut11 must be unfamiliar with the sidewinder TI-moly, or Ti-II. These are not all-titanium, but a very very strong alloy. I have their old tri-metal rear, which looks cool, but their Ti-II is one piece and probably functions better. They are made for longevity, not just light weight (though they are also shaped to be light and a light alloy). The alloy is 6 times harder than hardened aluminum and 3 times harder than the stainless steel most other companies use. I think my front is ti-moly, but it might be their tool steel, I really can't remember. Sidewinder also offers other options, like stainless, or high carbon, or tool steel, or arcaft aluminum alloys. In Ti-II I think a front is under a hundred, and a rear is about $175. Not cheap. But excellent.

            Problem I have is that I prefer 630, but some of the best stuff from sidewinder is 520.

            If you went thru 3 rear sprockets without changing the chain that's a real problem. As the chain wears, the bearings between the side plates and pins wear and that play increases the spacing between pins; that makes the full force be carried by just one roller on the chain, with a jolt when it transfers to the next. Time for all new sprockets and chain. Bad chains are what wears out your sprockets.

            I use sidewinder sealed chain now too. But it is expensive, so I consider the very best DID chain also to be a good investment.

            Of course when you change sprocket ratios you will need a yellow box or other way to correct your speedometer and odometer.
            Last edited by cyclecamper; 07-14-2010, 07:46 PM.
            It's about control skill; this is a motorized dance for joy and not Russian roulette.

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            • #7
              Re: Sprocket Change

              Yes I am unfamiliar with sidewinder anything. For me I'm not going to pay $175 for a sprocket. Even if it is 3 times as hard as steel. Why? Well a steel sprocket cost less than $50, and will last several years. The steel one on my TLR is four years old with at least 15,000 miles on it. At the rate it's wearing I'll get a few more years out of it yet. And yes I've been known to ride in a spirited manner quite a bit. So sure there is some fancy (expensive) hi tech stuff out there, but sometimes the simplest solution is best.

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              • #8
                Re: Sprocket Change

                I'm running a 17t in the front and a 45t in the rear. I love the setup, it wheeilies too easily. Oh and I say stick with steel sprockets. I've only had trouble with those aluminum vortex ones.
                Last edited by TL_Rider; 07-16-2010, 04:39 PM.

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                • #9
                  Re: Sprocket Change

                  hey cyclecamper, how many links did you use when hooking up a 630 chain please?
                  Cheers
                  If you can't beat them ...

                  Arrange to have them beaten!

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                  • #10
                    Re: Sprocket Change

                    Depends on where I put the axle on the extended swingarm.

                    Plus I use large sprockets, like a 19 front is my norm.
                    It's about control skill; this is a motorized dance for joy and not Russian roulette.

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